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Sustainable Shopping Says Farewell to Fast Fashion

Sustainable Shopping Says
Farewell to Fast Fashion

You recycle religiously at home and work, use public transportation to get to work, buy groceries at the local farmer’s market, and take your own bag along with you when you go shopping. You continually search for different ways to reduce waste and shrink your environmental footprint. But you might have overlooked one way in which you impact the planet the most– and it’s right under your nose!

Did you know that the cotton shirt that you bought on a whim, just because it was on sale, took 700 gallons of water to make? The unworn pair of jeans, collecting dust in the back of your closet, wasted another 1500 gallons. In fact, the amount of water it takes to produce the very outfit you have on right now is enough to fill up a small tanker truck. But just how bad are our clothes for environment?

The fast fashion industry is responsible for 20% of wasted water, 10% of global carbon emissions, and uses up more energy than the aviation and shipping industries combined, selling over 2 billion shirts and 1.2 billion pairs of jeans worldwide each year. And the solution to the world’s fashion problem starts in our own closets.

A growing movement of sustainable shoppers across the planet is using forward thinking to combat the wasteful ways of the fast fashion culture, and move the industry toward a greener future. By making environmentally responsible purchasing decisions for clothes, you help to curb one of the biggest contributors to global waste. Here are 7 green shopping habits to pick up, so you can use forward thinking to take fashion forward.

1. Get Thrifty with Your Threads

You saved your parents tons of money, all those years in school, going dressed in your older sibling’s hand-me-downs. But did you know that you were helping to save the world too? Buying used clothes reduces the demand for manufacturing new clothes and the need for mass-disposal of unsold products, strengthening the recycling community, as a whole. Fashion changes fast, but it also changes cyclically. So, it’s easy (and fun!) to find some hidden gems by browsing through secondhand stores, thrift shops, and even the back of your grandparents closet.

2. Stay Away from Synthetics 

Synthetics fabrics are non-biodegradable, oil-based material who’s manufacturing, use, and disposal come at a very high cost to the environment. Because they so cheap & easy to produce, synthetics lead to overproduction and enormous amounts of waste. Commonly used synthetics include nylon, acrylic, and spandex, with polyester being the industry-favorite amongst them. Avoid synthetic materials at all costs, and pick up the habit of wearing clothes made from eco-friendly natural fibers such as:

  • Organic Cotton
  • Bamboo
  • Linen
  • Hemp
  • Lyocell

3. Buy Less & Waste Less

When it comes to buying clothes, the temptation is real. So, deliver yourself from the temptation of fast fashion. Unsubscribe and delete yourself from mailing lists and apps that bombard you with apps that try to sell you clothes that aren’t sustainable. Keeping your eyes on your bank account and budget helps you stay focused on spending on only things you need. Also, having a screening process before buying a new piece will lessen the risk of making an unnecessary purchase. Ask yourself some questions first:

  • Do I really need this?
  • Is the material sustainable?
  • Is it comfy?
  • Will it match what I already have in my wardrobe?
  • How often will I wear this?

4. Create A Capsule Wardrobe

A capsule wardrobes is a collection of classic pieces that mix-and-match and create look after look with ease. Your most essential items serve as the foundation of your entire wardrobe, while “capsule” pieces can be layered over them, to get the look that matches the occasion. Building a capsule wardrobe around these timeless pieces provides your wardrobe the benefit of versatility, simplicity, and longevity keeps your style up to date on constantly changing trends of fast fashion for many years to come.

4. Create A Capsule Wardrobe

A capsule wardrobes is a collection of classic pieces that mix-and-match and create look after look with ease. Your most essential items serve as the foundation of your entire wardrobe, while “capsule” pieces can be layered over them, to get the look that matches the occasion. Building a capsule wardrobe around these timeless pieces provides your wardrobe the benefit of versatility, simplicity, and longevity keeps your style up to date on constantly changing trends of fast fashion for many years to come.

5. Rock Out In Rented Clothes

Since you can’t waste what you don’t own, borrowing clothes is a great way to save some money and reduce what you toss out. Renting a designer dress or suit for a special occasion is much more sustainable than buying something that you may never wear again.

6. Up-Cycle What's Unwearable

Another way to fight the fast fashion industry head on is by upcycling your old clothes into something you can use helps keep your threads out of the dumps. Repurposing them into things like pillowcases, tote bags, scarves, or blankets also allows you to hold on to the sentimental memories of a piece you’re particularly fond of.

7. Donate Instead of Dumping

Decluttering is an important part of giving your wardrobe a sustainable makeover. If you haven’t worn an item in a long time, you’re eliminating synthetic fabrics from your closet, or just not really feeling a particular piece anymore; donating them to a thrift store will keep them out of our landfills. Many consignment shops will even pay you for your old unwanted clothing. It’s another way how you can help boost your local recycling community.

8. Shop Locally

Local vendors can personally tell you where their materials are sourced from and how their clothes are made. Shopping locally also creates jobs for your neighbors, adds vitality to your neighborhood, and strengthens your local community

8. Shop Locally

Local vendors can personally tell you where their materials are sourced from and how their clothes are made. Shopping locally also creates jobs for your neighbors, adds vitality to your neighborhood, and strengthens your local community

Fashion-forward…forward thinking

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